June Farmers’ Markets: What’s In Season

NEW ENGLAND FARMERS’ MARKETS

Now that June has arrived, it’s safe to say that most local farmers markets are officially open. The opportunity to eat locally grown, in-season produce is a valuable and fun way to supply our bodies with deep nutrition. Local, organic produce tends to have greater nutritional profiles–with increased amounts of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. Not only are they sources of great nourishment for our bodies, but shopping locally helps support our regional food economies, small organic farms, and regenerative operations.

Some foods that are hitting peak freshness this month include:

Arugula
Asparagus
Beets
Broccoli
Broccoli
Fennel
Green beans
Leeks
Garlic
Kale

One of the major perks of eating locally is that the freshness of the food is worlds away from most supermarket produce–and thus needs less assistance to taste delicious. Arugula is a fantastic base for eggs, proteins, or salads. It’s peppery flavor pairs well with grilled steak or chicken, garlic, and savory toppings like pesto. 

Asparagus, beets, broccoli, broccoli rabe, and fennel are all great roasting and grilling vegetables. You can toss them with olive oil, pink salt, pepper, and some herbs, and then either roast them at 400º F until they’re golden, or wrap them up in tin foil and pop them on the grill. Leeks and garlic make great bases for dishes where vegetables and protein will be sautéed–like soup, chili, or dutch oven recipes. But they also work perfectly as flavor-enhancers on roasted or grilled foods. I love to sauté leeks and garlic until they’re golden brown, and add them to a big roasted vegetable platter.

If grilling veggies feels a bit foreign to you, I reccommend this very simple guide to get you started: https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/easy-grilled-vegetables/

 Lastly, kale can be used in seemingly countless ways. One of my favorite tricks to soften kale’s infamously rigid leaves is to massage it with avocado. Yep, that’s right: massage! Place 3-6 cups of sliced kale in a big bowl, add about ½ an avocado, and then mash it into the leaves with your clean hands. This combination makes a delicious base for salads. I often top it with cucumbers, roasted squash, red onions, pecans, and a protein.

Fortunately, there’s a large number of fantastic farms throughout New England. Some of my favorite markets include:

Needham Farmers Market: http://homesharetours.com/needhamfarmersmarket-2/

Clark Farm in Carlisle: http://clarkfarmcarlisle.com/aboutthefarmstand/

Coastal Growers Market at Casey Farm: http://www.coastalmarket.org/

Brookline Farmers Market: https://www.brooklinefarmersmarket.com/

A great resource for finding new farms to explore is the Eat Wild website: http://www.eatwild.com/products/massachusetts.html and http://www.eatwild.com/products/massachusettsresources.htm

This time of year is an excellent season to explore our local food economies, try new foods, and experiment with our nutrition. The freshness of what’s in-season can guide your tastebuds and health.

NEW ENGLAND FARMERS’ MARKETS

Now that June has arrived, it’s safe to say that most local farmers markets are officially open. The opportunity to eat locally grown, in-season produce is a valuable and fun way to supply our bodies with deep nutrition. Local, organic produce tends to have greater nutritional profiles–with increased amounts of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. Not only are they sources of great nourishment for our bodies, but shopping locally helps support our regional food economies, small organic farms, and regenerative operations.

Some foods that are hitting peak freshness this month include:

Arugula
Asparagus
Beets
Broccoli
Broccoli
Fennel
Green beans
Leeks
Garlic
Kale

One of the major perks of eating locally is that the freshness of the food is worlds away from most supermarket produce–and thus needs less assistance to taste delicious. Arugula is a fantastic base for eggs, proteins, or salads. It’s peppery flavor pairs well with grilled steak or chicken, garlic, and savory toppings like pesto. 

Asparagus, beets, broccoli, broccoli rabe, and fennel are all great roasting and grilling vegetables. You can toss them with olive oil, pink salt, pepper, and some herbs, and then either roast them at 400º F until they’re golden, or wrap them up in tin foil and pop them on the grill. Leeks and garlic make great bases for dishes where vegetables and protein will be sautéed–like soup, chili, or dutch oven recipes. But they also work perfectly as flavor-enhancers on roasted or grilled foods. I love to sauté leeks and garlic until they’re golden brown, and add them to a big roasted vegetable platter.

If grilling veggies feels a bit foreign to you, I reccommend this very simple guide to get you started: https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/easy-grilled-vegetables/

 Lastly, kale can be used in seemingly countless ways. One of my favorite tricks to soften kale’s infamously rigid leaves is to massage it with avocado. Yep, that’s right: massage! Place 3-6 cups of sliced kale in a big bowl, add about ½ an avocado, and then mash it into the leaves with your clean hands. This combination makes a delicious base for salads. I often top it with cucumbers, roasted squash, red onions, pecans, and a protein.

Fortunately, there’s a large number of fantastic farms throughout New England. Some of my favorite markets include:

Needham Farmers Market: http://homesharetours.com/needhamfarmersmarket-2/

Clark Farm in Carlisle: http://clarkfarmcarlisle.com/aboutthefarmstand/

Coastal Growers Market at Casey Farm: http://www.coastalmarket.org/

Brookline Farmers Market: https://www.brooklinefarmersmarket.com/

A great resource for finding new farms to explore is the Eat Wild website: http://www.eatwild.com/products/massachusetts.html and http://www.eatwild.com/products/massachusettsresources.htm

This time of year is an excellent season to explore our local food economies, try new foods, and experiment with our nutrition. The freshness of what’s in-season can guide your tastebuds and health.

2018-06-29T18:43:56+00:00

About the Author:

mm
Erin is a graduate student working toward a Masters of Science in Nutrition and Health Promotion, as well as completing the Didactic Program in Dietetics to become a Registered Dietitian. She’s also a Precision Nutrition Certified Nutrition Coach and Certified Sports Nutritionist.